Blog #10


As much as I can be an avid reader, I have to be honest, I have read next to zero Alaskan authors’ works; John Haines and Jon Krakauer being two I can remember. What I loved best of all is simply the exposure to the plethora there is of Alaskan authors and getting a small taste of them all. What I enjoyed has being to intimately understand the landscape in which they write about. As the authors write, my sense of smell, memory, and so much more becomes involved with the story.   I can actually “be there’ because often I have experienced or seen those same things growing up in Alaska. Many of the poets are able to draw a clear picture with very few words.

Alaskan writers like to use their surroundings in their poems and stories. The writers make a connection between the exterior landscape of Alaska and their internal psychological or emotion landscapes by writing about how the landscape makes them feel.  I really enjoyed the poem Tales of the North by Sheila Nickerson. Her poem is like a group of snapshot images to create a whole picture. She captures the magic and beauty of everyday life in Alaska. Mrs. Nickerson made a connection between the exterior landscape of Alaska and her internal psychological or emotional landscapes by writing about how the landscape feels and looks to her. Sheila Nickerson’s poem “Tales of the North’ shows the author’s emotion of loving the natural year round beauty of south east Alaska.

I think what I really loved about reading this collection of Alaskan stories is that I got a broad view of everything that Alaska has to offer. I learned about Alaska’s history, different geographic locations that I have never been to, and about all the different people and their cultures. After reading some of the excerpts I’m going to track down the books and read the whole story. This was a great class and I learned so much!

Forestgannets-fig1

 

 

 

 

 

 

mountaincaribou

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southeast Alaska
https://www.google.com/search?q=alaska+mountains&client=firefox-a&hs=gQE&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=D6-nUqLHGtjooASu4YGgBA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1138&bih=533#q=alaska+southeast+rainforest&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=q6CMtOdqlSlUVM%3A%3BYYfTVfdjiYXNNM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F2.bp.blogspot.com%252F-VDsCayLPxpI%252FTWVTwibRSfI%252FAAAAAAAAACg%252FraMNtZAjH2Q%252Fs1600%252FTemperate%252BRainforest%2525252C%252BCordova%2525252C%252BAlaska.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fechapterpnp.blogspot.com%252F2011%252F02%252Flicensure-by-endorsement.html%3B1600%3B1200

Polar Bears
https://www.google.com/search?q=alaska+mountains&client=firefox-a&hs=gQE&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=D6-nUqLHGtjooASu4YGgBA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1138&bih=533#q=alaska+ocean+ice&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=pttkC4UxEGlWiM%3A%3BkTQ913s_qKl-dM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fseagrant.uaf.edu%252Fnosb%252Fpapers%252F2010%252Fimages%252Fgannets-fig1.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fseagrant.uaf.edu%252Fnosb%252Fpapers%252F2010%252Fmt-village-gannets.php%3B400%3B267

Mount McKinley
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FMount_McKinley&h=0&w=0&sz=1&tbnid=pcG03jzGAocuXM&tbnh=183&tbnw=275&zoom=1&docid=vTIGeTA8CguAfM&ei=Fq-nUpirB4nuoASE7IDgDA&ved=0CAIQsCUoAA

Caribou

https://www.google.com/search?q=alaska+tundra&client=firefox-a&hs=F5Y&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=4a6nUrilNof8oASRvoDYCQ&ved=0CCsQsAQ&biw=1138&bih=533#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=KYChWMMMhc7PGM%3A%3BeAgCzZoe4wcC3M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.windows2universe.org%252Fearth%252Fpolar%252Fimages%252Fcaribou_alaska_fws_sm.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.windows2universe.org%252Fearth%252Fpolar%252Farctic_tundra.html%3B350%3B231

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